Good Sam RV Travel Guide & Campground Directory

Pet Travel Store Murrells Inlet SC

Owners traveling with pets have an obligation to clean up after their pet at the RV park. Read what other challenges face RVers with pets. It’s a good idea to immerse yourself every now and then in the world that you routinely write about. Otherwise known as a “reality check”, these real-life excursions confirm that the books and articles you write are still relevant. In my case, I primarily write about camping and RVing with pets.

Wayside Kennel Gear
(888) 765-2194
151 Duck Blind Place
Myrtle Beach, SC

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Dog Boarding of Myrtle Beach
(843) 602-5580
8500 Highway 544
Myrtle Beach , SC
Products
Day Care and Boarding for Dogs
Hours
7 am - 7pm
Prices and/or Promotions
15 / day and 25 / night

All Natural Cedar Dog House
(866) 596-4169
Blythewood, SC

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Cozy Country Doggie Ranch
(803) 424-2312
2611 Providence Rd
Cassatt, SC

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Ken-Nel Pet Food Distributors
(803) 319-1224
319 Cockspur Rd
Irmo, SC

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PetSmart
(843) 626-2164
1301 Oak Forest Lane
Myrtle Beach, SC
Hours
Monday - Friday: 9:00-9:00
Sunday: 10:00-6:00

BOW WOW BOUTIQUE
(843) 293-3647
3839-E SOCASTEE BLVD.
MYRTLE BEACH, SC
Products
DOG GROOMING & DAY CARE
Hours
8AM TO 5PM

Wet Nose Oasis
(803) 749-2349
7320-F Broad River Rd.
Irmo, SC

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Botanical Dog
(843) 864-9368
334 East Bay Street,#186
Charleston, SC

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Annamarie Johnson Artworks
(843) 345-2360
1390 Cortez St
N. Charleston, SC
Products
CAriCAtures of people and pets
Hours
as well as logo and misc design services. I also offer rescues and shelters across the country artwork that they CAn purchase and sell to generate funds or use for events."

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Cleaning Up After Your Pet

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RVing with Your Pet: Ideas for Making Your Stay at an RV Park a Little Easier With Pets


By Julee Meltzer

Shrinking Dogs and S&H Green Stamps

It’s a good idea to immerse yourself every now and then in the world that you routinely write about. Otherwise known as a “reality check”, these real-life excursions confirm that the books and articles you write are still relevant. In my case, I primarily write about camping and RVing with pets. So for the last two winters, I decided to immerse myself in one of the nation’s most popular RVing destinations (and maybe the most popular RVing with pets destination also)—Florida.

Florida, as many of you probably know, represents the winter getaway for millions of campers and RVers at hundreds of RV parks open all winter long. When the annual migration officially begins after the holidays, sleepy locales like Fort Myers, Orlando and the Florida Keys are quickly transformed into jam-packed RV park winter communities with big-city traffic, crowded restaurants and terrific weather. Thus, as a reality check for camping and RVing with pets, Florida is about as real as it gets.

First of all, someone or something is shrinking the dogs. It appears that the vast majority of RVers with pets now own dogs that weigh less than three pounds. On a typical walk, we routinely encounter miniature poodles, miniature dachshunds, miniature collies, and other dwindling little canines. By contrast, our German Shepherd now seems like a furry dinosaur that trudges through the campground looking for small dogs and other tasty snacks. I’m not sure where all the normal size dogs have gone but the trend is clear. Tiny is in.

On a more ordinary note, I’m still amazed at the level of voluntary compliance with the usual assortment of pet rules at RV parks. For example, most folks keep their dogs on a leash, and the vast majority of campers and RVers still pick up after their dogs when taking a walk around the RV park. They may not stop at stop signs, obey red lights, or call their mothers, but they do pick up after their dogs.

Even so, I’ve often wondered why campgrounds and RV parks don’t offer incentives (like green stamps or little prizes) to people who diligently pick up after their dogs. You would drop your little baggie off at a centrally located redemption center where an appreciative attendant would give you a hearty thank you and a “puppy poop picker-up-er” gold star that you could proudly wear around the campground.

My next observation has to do with the issue of exercise. As full-time RVers, we’ve noticed that very few parks and campgrounds offer fenced-in play areas for dogs. Anyone who has been traveling with pets has probably noticed this. Even though dogs need to run every day to stay in shape and use up excess energy—it’s been months since our dog had any real exercise. We do take our dog for a number of walks every day, but a dog can’t get much exercise while walking with a leash, and that is t...

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