Good Sam RV Travel Guide & Campground Directory

Bird Watching Campsites Prairieville LA

You can recognize many birds simply by noting their shapes, even if seen only in silhouette. Other useful characteristics are a bird's posture, size (easiest to judge if you use familiar birds as a size reference), flight pattern and/or head-on flight profile, and the kind of habitat in which the bird was seen. Start by learning to identify general groups of birds — warblers, flycatchers, hawks, owls, wrens — whose members all share certain similarities.

Vesta Mobile Home Park
(225) 644-2952
2228 S Burnside Ave
Gonzales, LA
 
Baton Route E. Koa Kampground
(225) 664-7281
7628 Vincent Rd
Denham Springs, LA
 
Big Oaks Mobile Home Park
(225) 355-4333
3700 Victoria Dr
Baton Rouge, LA
 
Bayou Bait Shop
(225) 659-7060
33195 Highway 75
Plaquemine, LA
 
KOA-Baton Rouge East*
(225) 664-7281
7628 Vincent Rd.
Denham Springs, LA
Campground Availability
Open All Year
Services
Escort to Site, Standard Flush, Basins, Hot Showers, Dump Station, Non Guest Dumping Allowed
Policies
Partial Handicap Access, Accomodates Big Rigs, Clubs Welcome, Pets OK
Additional Facilities
Picnic Tables, RV Supplies, Grills, Fire Rings, Ice, Patios, Laundry, Groceries, LP Gas by Weight, LP Gas by Meter
Recreation
Rec Hall, Rec Room, Pavilion, Coin Games, Pool, Wading Pool, Hot Tub, Playground, Mini Golf, Planned Group Activities, Basketball, Golf Nearby, Sports Field

Data Provided by:
Twin Lakes Mobile Estates
(225) 673-4199
37313 Highway 74
Geismar, LA
 
Courtney's Mobile Home Village
(225) 926-0076
2138 Wooddale Blvd # 11
Baton Rouge, LA
 
Night Rv Park
(225) 275-0679
14740 Florida Blvd
Baton Rouge, LA
 
Lamar Dixon Expo Center RV Park
(225) 621-1700
Gonzales, LA
Campground Availability
Open all Year
Services
Standard Flush, Basins, Hot Showers
Policies
Accomodates Big Rigs, Family Camp, Clubs Welcome, Pets OK
Recreation
Planned Group Activities, Sports Field

Data Provided by:
Farr Park Campground & Horse Activity Center
(225) 769-7805
Baton Rouge, LA
Campground Availability
Open all Year
Services
Standard Flush, Basins, Hot Showers, Dump Station, Non Guest Dumping Allowed
Policies
Partial Handicap Access, Clubs Welcome, Pets OK
Additional Facilities
Picnic Tables, Laundry
Recreation
Pavilion, Playground, Planned Group Activities, Tennis, Basketball, Golf Nearby, Sports Field, Hiking Trails, REC Open to Public

Data Provided by:
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Learn the Basics to Bird Identification

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Bird Watching 101


By Maxye and Lou Henry

Have you always wondered how experienced birders can confidently identify birds with just a glimpse? This information from the Cornell University Lab or Ornithology will help you learn the identification skills you need by describing the characteristics birders pay particular attention to in the field.

You can recognize many birds simply by noting their shapes, even if seen only in silhouette. Other useful characteristics are a bird's posture, size (easiest to judge if you use familiar birds as a size reference), flight pattern and/or head-on flight profile, and the kind of habitat in which the bird was seen.

Start by learning to identify general groups of birds — warblers, flycatchers, hawks, owls, wrens — whose members all share certain similarities. As your observation skills improve, familiarize yourself with the field marks — colored or patterned areas on the bird's body, head, and wings — that help distinguish species.

Birds in the same general group often have the same body shape and proportions, although they may vary in size. Silhouette alone gives many clues to a bird's identity, allowing birders to assign a bird to the correct group or even the exact species.

Posture clues can help place a bird in its correct group. Watch an American robin, a common member of the thrush family, strut across a yard. Notice how it takes several steps, then adopts an alert, upright stance with its breast held forward. Other thrushes have similar postures, as do larks and shorebirds.

Once you have assigned a bird to its correct group, size can be a clue to its actual species. Be aware, though, that size can be difficult to determine in the field, especially under poor lighting conditions or at a distance. Size comparisons are most useful when the unknown bird is seen side-by-side with a familiar species. In the absence of that, you can use the sizes of well-known birds, such as the house sparrow, American robin and American crow, as references when trying to identify an unfamiliar bird.

Most birds fly in a straight line, flapping in a constant rhythm, but certain bird groups have characteristic flight patterns that can help identify them. Birds of prey may be identified by the characteristic way they hold their wings when viewed flying toward you.

In general, each species of bird occurs only within certain types of habitat. And each plant community — whether abandoned field, mixed deciduous/coniferous forest, desert or freshwater marsh, for instance — contains its own predictable assortment of birds. Learn which birds to expect in each habitat. You may be able to identify an unfamiliar bird by eliminating from consideration species that usually live in other habitats. (Be aware, though, that during spring and fall migration birds often settle down when they get tired and hungry, regardless of habitat.)

Here are some birding hotspots and the species most likely to be seen ...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Woodall's

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