Good Sam RV Travel Guide & Campground Directory

Dog Boarding Topeka KS

Although it may seem that the cost of RV camping with your dog might not cost much more than having your dog live at home, there are a number of hidden costs that aren’t all that noticeable until you actually hit the road.

Potwin Pet Clinic
(785) 232-7779
526 Sw Washburn Ave
Topeka, KS
Veterinary Medical & Surgical Hospital Of Topeka
(785) 267-6060
1515 Sw 29th St
Topeka, KS
All About Pets
(785) 783-0629
2061 Se California Ave
Topeka, KS
Animal Clinic Of North Topeka
(785) 357-5188
625 Nw US Highway 24
Topeka, KS
West Ridge Animal Hospital
(785) 272-8354
2147 Sw Westport Dr
Topeka, KS
Aid Animal Hospital
(785) 233-7664
2408 Sw 6th Ave
Topeka, KS
(785) 272-3323
2020 SW Westport Dr

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Highland Park Animal Clinic
(785) 232-2205
2061 Se California Ave
Topeka, KS
Mah Tommy L
(785) 357-5188
625 Nw US Highway 24
Topeka, KS
Shawnee Animal Hospital
(785) 272-3244
2113 Sw Gage Blvd
Topeka, KS
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RVing with Dogs

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RVing with Dogs – The Bottom Line

By Julee Meltzer

Recently, someone asked us how much it actually costs to RV with dogs. My initial response was that it doesn’t cost any more to RV with a dog than it does to live with one at home. After all, no matter where you are, your dog still needs food, medical care, toys, and so on. But after thinking about the issue a little further, I realized that RVing with dogs did, in fact, have a number of hidden costs that aren’t all that noticeable until you actually hit the road. So before you decide to take your pooch on a camping adventure, consider some of the hidden costs described here.

Extra Leashes

For some unknown reason – we always end up buying extra leashes when were on the road. Okay…Okay. It’s not exactly an unknown reason. Our male has a horrible habit of biting his leash in half whenever we’re at a rest stop. The last time it happened, we had pulled into a busy rest stop on a major Interstate. I hooked up his leash and opened the door. As we were carefully navigating around the giant tractor-trailers that packed the area, he grabbed the leash with his back teeth and in one quick bite, freed himself and stood there looking at me. New Leash: $40. Near Heart Attack: Life Changing.

Visit to the Vet

Before you take your dog with you, schedule a trip to the vet. The vet will give them a check up, trim their nails, clean their ears, and make sure they have all their shots. In particular, make sure they’re up-to-date on their rabies vaccinations. One reason is that many campsites require written proof that your dog is vaccinated. Consequently, ask your vet for a copy of your dog’s medical records and make sure it shows that they’re up-to-date on their rabies shots. Vet Visit: $150. Peace of Mind: Inestimable.

Heartworm Medication

Since heartworm is transmitted by mosquitoes, you normally only have to give your dog heartworm medication (i.e., Heartguard™) during the summer months. However, if you take your “snowdog” to warmer places in the winter, you’ll have to give them the medication year round. If you have any doubt about heartworm disease, ask your vet to show you the worm infested dog heart they keep in a jar. The first time I saw one, I bought enough heartworm medication for 12 months. Heartworm Medication: $40/month. Image of Jar: Unforgettable.

Flea and Tick Medication

If you plan on staying in a warm place this winter, purchase plenty of flea and tick medication (Frontline™). Flea and tick medication isn’t cheap but it beats the cost of treating your dog for Lyme disease. Plus, the first time you see a swollen tick embedded into your dog’s head, you’ll be glad that you treated them with the medication because in less than 24 hours – the tick will fall off and die. Flea and Tick Medication: $35/month. Tick-Free Dog: Enough Said.

Travel Bowls, Beds, Toys, and Other Travel Accessories

RVing with a dog takes a little planning as we...

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