Good Sam RV Travel Guide & Campground Directory

Vancouver Travel Midvale UT

This page provides relevant content and local businesses that can help with your search for information on Vancouver Travel. You will find informative articles about Vancouver Travel, including "Vancouver: a British Columbia Jewel". Below you will also find local businesses that may provide the products or services you are looking for. Please scroll down to find the local resources in Midvale, UT that can help answer your questions about Vancouver Travel.

Marilyn Hyde
(801) 966-4242
2122 W 5400 S
Salt Lake City, UT
Agency
Hyde's Encore Tours & Travel
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Destinations
Australia / New Zealand, Canada, Caribbean, Europe-Northern, Europe-Western, U.S. - Alaska, U.S. - Hawaii, U.S. - Midwest, U.S. - Northeast, U.S. - Southeast, U.S. - West
Specialities
Amusement / Theme Parks, Archeology, Barge / Canal / RiverCruises, Castles / Villas, Cruising / Cruise Lines, Family Fun, Family Travel, Historical, Motorcoach / Bus, Music & Performing Arts, National Parks, Rail, Religious, Senior / Mature Adult
Website
www.hydetour.com

Data Provided by:
Toby Nash
(801) 268-4470
4376 S 700 E Ste 200
Salt Lake City, UT
Agency
Cruise & Travel Masters
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Specialities
Group Vacation, Honeymoon, Leisure Travel, Luxury Travel
Website
www.cruiseandtravelmasters.com

Data Provided by:
Brian Mei
(801) 466-8811
2906 S State St
Salt Lake City, UT
Agency
Eastern Travel
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Destinations
Asia-Central Asia, Asia-China, Japan, Korea Mongolia, Asia-Southeast Asia
Specialities
Camping / Hiking, Adventure Travel, Boating / Yacht / Sailing, Barge / Canal / RiverCruises
Website
www.easterntravel.com

Data Provided by:
Robert Jelf
(801) 957-8380
4315 S 2700 W R 140
Salt Lake City, UT
Agency
American Express Travel Representative Network
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Website
www.americanexpress.com/travel

Data Provided by:
Sherry Dyer
(801) 583-1335
1338 Foothill Dr #270
Salt Lake City, UT
Agency
Dyer's International Travel
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Website
www.dyerstravel.com

Data Provided by:
Barbara Lavin
(801) 261-2872
4753 S Chestnut Glen Dr
Salt Lake City, UT
Agency
Cruise and Tour Center of North America
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Website
www.travelsense.org

Data Provided by:
Michelle Fontaine
(408) 984-7000
8075 S Copper Canyon Way
West Jordan, UT
Agency
Casto
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Website
www.casto.com

Data Provided by:
Herman Warnas
(801) 968-4400
2990 Midwest Dr
Salt Lake City, UT
Agency
Ultimate Travel and Events Inc
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Website
www.ultimatetravelinc.com

Data Provided by:
Brett Steele
(801) 364-4300
320 East 900 South
Salt Lake City, UT
Agency
PanAmerican Tours and Travel
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Website
www.panam-tours.com

Data Provided by:
Douglas Wren
(801) 364-4481
320 E 900 S
Salt Lake City, UT
Agency
Wren & Fida International
Membership Associations
American Society of Travel Agents
Website
www.wrenandfida.com

Data Provided by:
Data Provided by:

Vancouver: a British Columbia Jewel

Provided By: 

Vancouver: a British Columbia Jewel
By Charles Shugart, Jr.

Vancouver is Canada’s third largest city (metro population of 2,250,000), after Toronto and Montreal. Comparable in beauty and international sophistication to San Francisco, Vancouver has the additional benefit of high mountains just north of the city.

The area has been populated for thousands of years by Native Americans. Like those who arrived later, the native people benefited from the mild climate, good fishing, and abundance of trees. Western red cedar trees were perfect for making boats. Hollow them out with stone tools, shape them so they were sea-worthy, carve paddles for the men, and away they went.

The first non-native to visit the region was a Spanish boat captain—Jose Maria Narvaez—in 1791. Captain George Vancouver arrived in 1792, representing England.

Although some of the coastline was mapped and prominent geographic places named, no real settling by Europeans happened until after Simon Fraser crossed the northern part of the continent in 1808. Coming down the Fraser River (named after him, of course), he met the Pacific Ocean at what was to become the city of Vancouver. Even after that, however, there were few settlements until the gold discoveries along tributaries to the Fraser River starting in the 1860s. At that time, the importance of Vancouver as a shipping port quickly became apparent. Crossing the continent by land was still a lengthy journey; sailing around the Horn of South America was much better—although it also was a long and dangerous undertaking.

As the west coast of British Canada became settled, there was an obvious need for a transcontinental railroad linking British Columbia to the rest of Canada. But it was an expensive and lengthy undertaking, and the federal government was loath to begin. That is, they were until British Columbia basically said, “Build us a railroad or we’ll ask the United States to annex us.” Construction of the rail line began not long afterward.

Vancouver was the logical western terminus for the tracks, so the Canadian Pacific Railroad was built in 1887—from the Canadian prairies across the Rockies near Banff, and following the Thompson and Fraser rivers to the sea. This led to much greater and faster growth.

The Klondike Gold Rush of 1897 and 98 had considerable impact also. Vancouver, Seattle, Portland and San Francisco were the ports from which tens of thousands of Argonauts set sail up the Inside Passage.

Starting in the latter years of the 20th century, Vancouver has become a real melting pot of newcomers from all over the world. Some of the greatest impact has been from the Hong Kong Chinese. Fleeing the erstwhile “British Crown Colony” before China laid legal claim to Hong Kong in 1997 (Britain’s lease was up), these Chinese businessmen grabbed their British passports, families and considerable bank accounts and crossed the ocean. Thousands poured into Vancouver. Their impact has been profou...

Click here to read the rest of this article from Woodall's

/div>